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Haftu kebede
Mengistu Urge
Kefelegn Kebede
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Mengistu Urge
Kefelegn Kebede
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Global Journal of Poultry Farming and Vaccination

Vol. 2 (3), pp. 121-125

Full Length Research Paper 

Effect of replacing maize with malted barley grain on fertility, hatchability, embryonic mortality and chick quality of white leghorn layers

Haftu kebede1, Mengistu Urge2 and Kefelegn Kebede3

1Department of Animal Sciences, Wachemo University, Ethiopia,

2,3School of Animal and Range Sciences, Haramaya University, Ethiopia,

*Corresponding Author’s Email: haftuk2001@gmail.com 

Accepted 10 November, 2014

Abstract

The study was conducted to evaluate the effects of different levels of malted barley grain (MBG) on fertility, hatchability, embryonic mortality and chick quality of white leghorn (WL) layer for 90 days. Malted barley added to diets at levels of 0% (T1), 10% (T2), 20% (T3) and 30% (T3) of malted barley grain. One hundred eighty white leghorn layers with average initial body weight of 1036.20± 31.097 g (mean ± S.D) were randomly allocated into the 4 treatment groups with 3 replicates of 15 birds each in CRD design. The result showed that there was significant difference (P<0.05) in chick weight, but it had no significant effects on other traits. Therefore, MBG can be replaced for maize grain as a source of energy up to 30%, since the present experiment did not negatively affected fertility, hatchability, embryonic mortality and chick quality.

Keywords: Fertility, hatchability, layer diet, malted barley grain